Galveston Cemetery: Tombs

Since I was a child, I have wanted to stop at this lovely cemetery. I’d beg my parents to stop there every time we made the trek down from Humble to the seawall. Well, the universe finally decided to stop denying me the very reasonable request to investigate this place!

I like how the palm trees are swaying in the breeze!
I like how the palm trees are swaying in the breeze!

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The cemetery is right off Broadway smack in the middle of a neighborhood.
The cemetery is right off Broadway smack in the middle of a neighborhood.

 

South Austin History: Maria de la Luz Cemetery

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About a block down the road from the Masonic cemetery in south Austin, you’ll find the Mexican cemetery. The growth of Austin has the place surrounded. I’m not sure if there are many spaces left for burial. It seems fairly full upon close examination. There are “empty” areas, but the ground rolls from the compression of soil upon the caskets.

I find both cemeteries aesthetically pleasing but for different reasons. The Masonic cemetery is your traditional, slightly intimidating, sedate resting place. The Mexican cemetery, on the other hand, applies color and individuality in a manner which would be unexpected in the traditional Western burial ground.

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The four nerve daisies were all in bloom today.

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South Austin history…in Cemetery form (Part II)

I visited Live Oak Cemetery on Sunday along with the Masonic Cemetery, also known as Boggy Creek Cemetery, this past Sunday. My next goal is to visit (well, re-visit) the south Austin Mexican cemetery soon for some pictures. I’ll wait for a sunny day for that excursion.

There are a couple of cemeteries in central Texas by the name Live Oak. This one is in far south Travis County. I live near FM 1626, which runs right into IH 35. Live Oak is down Old San Antonio Road, which is between South 1st and IH 35. When you head down Old San Antonio Road, take a right where you see the wood sign for the cemetery.

The entrance is not remarkable, but you won’t miss the place.

The only local name I recognized was Baurle. There’s a subdivision to the west called Bauerle Ranch, so I imagine the land it sits on was once the ranch owned by that family.

I was unable to get a picture because I was spooked out while in the graveyard. No, it wasn’t the dead people. It was:

(1) Nothing like having a car tail you into a graveyard. I wouldn’t have been spooked, but the car would NOT PARK. Kept driving around all stupid-like. Finally it parked, so I felt relatively comfortable getting out. There’s no one to hear you scream in a graveyard….

(2) Even better when the cops show up! A sheriff saw me near the graves up at the front of the cemetery and zoomed into the place. Stopped by my car, ran my plates. Then made his slow “cop stare” way out. Great. I know it’s private property. But I’m trying to document local history and sites. That’s not illegal.

Anyhow, by then I was running out of light to get decent pictures. Here are the graves that stood out to me. There was another, but the individual was recently deceased and a minor. His grave was excellent and told me his life story in pictures. But I just don’t feel right posting it since I don’t know his family. He looked like a cool dang kid, though.

Woodmen of the World family plot. These were a benefit of belonging to the organization, but it became too costly to continue the gravestone program.
Woodmen of the World family plot. These were a benefit of belonging to the organization, but it became too costly to continue the gravestone program.
Alfred Earl Jones died in WWI. There was another child simply called "Baby" in the family plot.
In the Woodmen plot. Alfred Earl Jones died in WWI. There was another child simply called “Baby” in the family plot.
Fannie Lula Stevens
Fannie Lula Stevens. They do not make cool names like that any more. 
Flowers and a tree have absorbed part of Fannie Lula Stevens
Flowers and a tree have absorbed part of Fannie Stevens

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I promise it's more scary in real life. You walk along and BAM! What the....What?!
I promise it’s more scary in real life. You walk along and BAM! What the….What?!

Concordia Cemetery–Chinese Section (El Paso)

If you go to EP, it’s on the north side of IH10 when you are driving west towards downtown from the airport. Take the Copia Street exit. Really, if you do nothing else in EP on your business trip, visit this cemetery. That is, if you have already taken the drive up Rim Road/Scenic Drive! If you haven’t taken that drive on your trip…well…I’m just sad for you. EP has so much scenery and history to offer–even if you only have a single hour to spare you should be able to find something to admire.

Even though the cemetery right off the interstate, it’s a fairly peaceful resting place. And, even though I have been there about 5 times now, I haven’t yet explored every corner. Frankly, I’ve been too busy obsessing heavily on the Caples family mausoleum and John Wesley Hardin’s grave. There is so much more for me to learn about El Paso’s history, though.

I finally visited the Chinese section. As you probably already know, the Chinese population came to the West to work on the railroads. The graves are very orderly in this section, unlike in the rest of the cemetery. I don’t know enough about burial traditions to tell you what that one box is in the middle of this section. I’ll have to do further research.

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Oh, and I totally freaked myself out when I was in the corner taking the feature pic. I thought, “Sh*t! Perfect location for a good zombie ankle-grab from what used to be Yee Yick. He’s under that slab, and he could get me with a zombie hand now.” And then it was all over for me. eeep! eeep! eeep! Ran to the sunlight…’cause zombies don’t move quick in the sunlight.

Gawd. I feel like an idiot now. But, at the time it was really creepish. I swear! And now here it is on the dang internet for everyone to see. Oh boy.